iOS Dev Tools

The greatest iOS development tools, including websites, desktop and mobile apps, and back-end services. Updated daily by Max Ott.

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Command Line
screenshot of xcpretty

xcpretty

A command line tool for formatting xcodebuild output. xcpretty pretty aims to be a fast and flexible formatter that dramatically improves the readability of xcodebuild output. It is designed to be piped with xcodebuild and thus keeping 100% compatibility with it. It’s even a bit faster than xcodebuild itself, since it saves your terminal some prints. There are a few different formats to choose from including simple, Spec style, and Test-Anything-Protocol compatible. You can also specify reporters to create JUnit-Style XML or simple HTML reports, or create your own custom formatters. […]

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Command Line
screenshot of TLDR pages

TLDR pages

A collection of simplified and community-driven man pages for various terminal commands. TLDR pages aims to be an ever-growing collection of simplified “show me the common usages” man pages for the most common UNIX, Linux, OSX and SunOS commands. There are currently over 240 pages, each focussing on the most common usages, aimed at new or rusty command-line users. They don’t explain general UNIX concepts and introduce examples gradually. But, of course, they don’t cover everything; that’s what man is for! […]

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Command Line
screenshot of Swiftline

Swiftline

A set of tools to help you create command line applications in Swift. Swiftline is comprised of several tools including: Colorize, which adds colours and styles to strings before writing them to the terminal; Ask, Choose and Agree, for creating different kinds of prompts to get information from the user; Run, a quick way to run an external command and read its standard output and standard error; Env, to read and write environment variables; and Args, which parses command line arguments and return a hash of the passed flags. […]

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Command Line
screenshot of Blade

Blade

A command line tool for making a better asset workflow for iOS developers. Blade will automatically build and rebuild Xcode image catalogs for app icons, universal images, and more using a Bladefile that specifies all your resources. It can automatically set up your Bladefile based on your existing Xcode project or you can use templates of asset catalogs which it will later populate. Once configured, a single command will generate all of the images needed within each image catalog. […]

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Command Line
screenshot of Buck

Buck

A command line build system developed and used by the engineers at Facebook. Buck encourages the creation of small, reusable modules consisting of code and resources which are built in parallel to take advantage of multiple cores on your machine. It also reduces incremental build times by keeping track of unchanged modules so that the minimal set of modules is rebuilt. Buck integrates with Xcode and will generate all the configuration files it needs to work with your project by loading the iOS template. […]

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Command Line
screenshot of CommandLine

CommandLine

A pure Swift library for creating command-line interfaces. CommandLine gives you all the features you need to simplify creating command line tools in Swift. This includes automatically generated usage/help messages, supports for all common flag styles (string, bool, counter, double, etc.), intelligent handling of negative int & float arguments, locale-aware float parsing, type-safe Enum options, and just for fun, full emoji support (although this is obviously not recommended). […]

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Command Line
screenshot of Synx

Synx

A command-line tool that reorganises your Xcode project folder to match your Xcode groups. If your project folder is an unwieldy mess of sub folders or a single folder containing all project files but your Xcode project is sorted neatly into groups, you can use Synx to quickly reorganise you project folder into shape. Although the default options will probably satisfy your needs, there are also options to also remove source files and image resources that are not referenced by your Xcode project and to exclude specific groups. […]

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Command Line
screenshot of Cakebrew

Cakebrew

An open source Mac app for Homebrew. Homebrew is a package manager for OS X which lets you install thousands of command-line applications that would require manual compilation, but it requires using the command line. Cakebrew makes using Homebrew much easier by providing a GUI for all your Homebrew tasks like installing, uninstalling, and updating formulae, and running Homebrew doctor to find problems. […]

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Command Line
screenshot of Liftoff

Liftoff

A command line tool for creating and configuring iOS Xcode projects. If you run Liftoff on a directory with an existing Xcode project it will perform various actions to get your project in shape, such as changing indentation levels, turning on warnings, adding default .gitignore and .gitattributes files, and initializing a new git repo. If Liftoff can’t find an Xcode project, it will create one for you. Liftoff is completely customisable (and open-source) and configurations can easily be shared. […]

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Command Line
screenshot of objc-run

objc-run

A shell script which compiles and executes Objective-C source code files from the command line. objc-run is really useful for quickly testing a piece of code or if you have a small programming task that you want to handle in Objective-C that doesn’t justify setting up a complete Xcode project. It also integrates nicely with CocoaPods. objc-run has made Objective-C my new favourite scripting language! […]

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